The Rysbrack Monument

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The fine marble monument on the north wall of the  chancel was created by the famous 18th century Flemish sculptor Michael Rysbrack. 

Born in Amsterdam, Rysbrack came to England in 1720. He soon became the most fashionable sculptor of the day noted for his outstanding portrait busts. Notable examples of his work include his monument to Sir Isaac Newton in Westminster Abbey and busts of the rich and famous of the day including Marlborough, Walpole and Pope.

Hardingstone's Rysbrack monument is in memory of Bartholomew Clarke of Roehampton and Lady Bouverie - grandfather and mother of Edward Bouverie, purchaser of nearby Delapre Abbey. The two of them are shown side by side as portrait busts. Beneath is another portrait of Hitch Young, brother-in law to Bartholomew. 

It is likely that the memorial was commissioned by Edward Bouverie, who as a second son of Viscount Folkestone had inherited the Clarke lands in Hardingstone through his mother and in 1764 purchased Delapre Abbey to create his own country estate.